dtaylorDonald H. Taylor, Jr., Ph.D., is a Professor in Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy, who is a health policy scholar who focuses on end-of-life policy generally, with a particular interest in Medicare hospice benefit reform, Long Term Care, and integration of palliative care into the health care system. He has broad interests in how to evaluate new payment and care delivery models throughout the health care system, with a goal of increasing value for the money we spend as a nation. Taylor has secondary appointments in the Schools of Business, Nursing and Medicine (Community and Family Medicine). He is also a faculty member in the Center for Pragmatic Health Systems Research in the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) where his research infrastructure is located, as well as in the Margolis Center for Health Policy. He formerly served a two-year term (2013-2015) as an elected member of the Executive Committee of the Academic Council (ECAC) at Duke, the primary faculty governance body at the University. He currently serves as Chair of the University Priorities Committee (2016-2016), a member of the Duke Global Health Institute’s Executive Committee, and the Business and Finance Committee of the Duke University Board of Trustees. He has published numerous peer-review articles and written or co-written three books. His papers have appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, BMJ, Health Affairs, The American Economic Review, Journal of Clinical Oncology, and others. He is currently Principal Investigator of several research projects, including a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) Round 2 award on community-based palliative care in conjunction with Four Seasons Compassion for Life, a hospice and palliative care organization in Western North Carolina. He has been Principal Investigator of 2 NIH and 1 AHRQ funded RO1 Awards, and 1 AHRQ funded R18 award in addition to an NIH funded RO3 and R55 Shannon Directors Award, and several Foundation grants. His book Balancing the Budget is a Progressive Priority, was published by Springer in May 2012, and proposed a next step “political deal” on health reform that could build upon the ACA. He has wrote 29 columns on health reform for the Raleigh, N.C. News and Observer during the 2009-2010 period, and has contributed to The New York Times’ Room for Debate forum. He blogged from March 2011-March 2012 at The Incidental Economist before restarting his personal blog freeforall (www.donaldhtaylorjr.com) in March 2012.